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Author: Shirley Ruetimann

Body Mindfulness Studio / Articles posted by Shirley Ruetimann (Page 2)

Understanding Your Spine & How to Keep it Healthy – Part 2 (Sacroiliac Joint)

The sacroiliac joints (SI) connect the sacrum, the triangular shaped bone at the base of the lumbar spine to the left and right iliac bones, the large bones that form your pelvis. The SI joints have several functions They support the weight of your torso when you are upright They help maintain balance as you walk They act as shock absorbers for your spine They act as a hub for the transfer of force between your legs and your torso They are designed as a stable joint with limited mobility. Movement includes Nutation or anterior tilt (flexion) of the sacrum between the ilia Counter-nutation or posterior tilt (extension) of the sacrum between the ilia Small movements of the ilia themselves Stability of an SI joint depends primarily on the stout...

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Understanding Your Spine & How to Keep it Healthy – Part 1

The spine is complex and is one of the most important components in the body. I think it is important for everyone to have some understanding of its anatomy so that they can make appropriate decisions about treatment if they suffer from back pain, or want to maintain a healthy spine. The spine is made up of 33 individual bones (vertebrae) stacked on top of each other in 5 areas: Cervical Spine - consists of 7 vertebrae C1 - C7. C1 is the atlas vertebra; your skull sits on top of this. C2 is the axis vertebra.C3 - C7 comprise the neck. Thoracic Spine - has 12 vertebrae known as T1 - T12 and forms your upper and middle back. Lumbar Spine - consists of...

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Foot Anatomy, Problems and Top Tips for Functional Feet

As summer approaches I often teach a series of classes dedicated to “unloved body parts” as we prepare to peel off extra layers and get ready for the holiday season. For many, feet fall into this category, yet as the foundation of our bodies they are a really important part of our natural balance-keeping systems. Humans have a unique foot shape that allows us to walk, run, climb and do many other activities. Although hands have a similar structure, feet, because they bear more weight, are stronger and less mobile. The bones of the foot are organised in rows, named tarsal bones, metatarsal bones and phalanges. These make up the toes and blade of the foot. The largest bone of the foot is the heel (calcaneus), it...

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Knees – Anatomy & Health

Knees are something of a hot topic in the studio at the moment. I thought you might benefit from understanding their anatomy, typical problems, why they occur and tips for maintaining knee health. Knee Anatomy The knee is one of the largest and most complex joints in the body. It is a synovial joint which connects the femur (thigh bone) and the tibia (shin bone) in the lower leg (tibiofemoral joint). The fibula (calf bone), the other bone in the lower leg is connected to the joint but is not directly affected by the joint action. There is a second joint where the knee cap meets the femur ( patellofemoral joint). These two joints work together to form a modified hinge joint that allows the knee to...

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Spring Cleaning (Lymphatic System)

Spring is one of my favourite times of the year; Increased daylight, crisp mornings that develop into warm days and the first delicate blossoms prompt me to clear out the clutter that has accumulated during the long winter 'hibernation”.  Husband and children run for the hills as I turn out every cupboard, and drawer before tackling the attic and cellar. My body too seems to want to take advantage of this special awakening time, and as many of you have asked me about Lymph flow recently, I thought it timely to write about the body’s behind-the-scenes cleaning system. The Lymphatic System has long been recognised in Ayurveda and Chinese medicine for its importance in preventative health care. Why? Because it supports every other system in the...

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Time to Detox

In an ideal world we would all grow our own organic food, eat according to nature’s bounty and breathe clean air. In reality we try to eat healthily, get too little sleep, drink alcohol and live in an urban environment full of unavoidable toxins. Our bodies naturally have a great way of detoxing, but that doesn’t mean we can’t support it from time to time. Spring is a great time to detox; here are my 8 top tips to help you boost that internal ability:  Alkalise your body  - The body’s pH is closely regulated and when it drifts out of balance so does our health, because the body’s natural detox pathways work better in an alkaline environment. Spring and Summer are times when there is an...

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Big Toe Injury and Back pain

A year ago I partially severed and crushed the big toe of my left foot and had surgery to pin and stitch it. I was told full recovery would take a year and that my big toe would be stiff, but otherwise not to expect any long-term problems. Having done extensive bodywork, I felt my body was in a good place and wouldn’t be significantly affected by this injury – how wrong could I be? Following a successful surgical outcome and returning to work four weeks after the incident, it soon became apparent that all was not well. I was experiencing knee pain, my pelvis had become rotated and lower back pain followed. The road to full recovery has been long and slow but my salvation has...

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Free to Move – Fit to Shoot

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_video link="https://youtu.be/ZJzdjHIQyLI"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text] Free to Move – Fit to Shoot ( A Unique Programme for Shooters) As a shooter I am very aware of the demands our sport places on the body. I have met shooters so afflicted with neck and shoulder damage that they require surgery or worse have to give up the sport they love. Although tales of being unable to put on shooting stockings without assistance due to lower back stiffness or struggling to remove a sweater because recoil has rendered the wearer unable to lift their arms are a humorous part of shoot day chatter, they are also indicative of the chronic effects of our one sided sport. Jokes aside, the effects of recoil are cumulative and cannot be underestimated. This video clip of John...

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The Importance of Working Safely (Part 1)

January is a time when most of us feel the urge to do something good for our health and fitness. This enthusiasm, and desire for results can often lead to trying too hard in class or comparing your flexibility, mobility and posture to your neighbour. Method Putkisto is a gentle, non-impact exercise that will reform your body, but like any form of exercise it is important to work safely, at your own pace and within your own limits, particularly if you are new to exercise, have had a long period without exercising or are recovering from injury. In this blog, I am going to explain why we do certain things in class and give you a few watchpoints for working safely. 1)  Centreline and Centreing Method Putkisto places demands on...

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Tuning in to the Magic within – Is your mind the most powerful tool when exercising?

“All that we are arises with our thoughts. With our thoughts, we make the world.” –Buddha One of the most frequent comments I receive from clients regarding why they enjoy Method Putkisto is that they cannot think about anything else whilst practising. Not only is it de-stressing, to be able to put those to-do lists, commuting annoyances and family worries to one side, but this enables them to get better results from their bodies. Focus It may sound obvious to say everybody’s body is different and therefore how each person experiences movement and exercise is different. You also arrive at each exercise session in a different emotional state, and this influences motivation. Consider the effect of exercising whilst in pain, agitated or depressed? However, by turning your attention inward, for...

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