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Fitness

Functional Breathing – What, Why, How

On my daily walks, I cannot fail but be impressed by the number runners of all ages and levels of fitness that now populate the park. It may be my imagination, but it seems as though more people have taken up running since Covid-19  arrived on the scene. Apart from running technique (more on this in another blog), I notice their breathing as they plod/shuffle or soar past maintaining (mostly) social distance. So, is there a correct way to breathe and why does it matter? How you breathe affects every area of your physical and mental wellbeing. Whether it is premature ageing, dodgy digestion, weight gain, disturbed sleep, anxiety or reduced athletic performance, poor breathing is usually a factor. If you suffer from asthma,  hay fever or...

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Why Young People Should Stretch

Whether you are an athlete or have an average level of physical activity, I believe stretching should be an integral part of your daily life. Often, young people focus on building muscle and developing aerobic fitness, but flexibility is equally important. Why Stretch? Stretching is necessary - it helps keep muscles and fascia flexible, strong and healthy, thus maintaining range of motion in the joints. A short tight muscle is a weak muscle. For example, young people who are office based or in full-time education sit in a chair for a large part of the day. This tightens the hip flexors and hamstrings making it more difficult to extend the legs and knees fully, which affects walking. Now imagine what could happen when more stress is placed on...

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Understanding Your Spine & How to Keep it Healthy – Part 2 (Sacroiliac Joint)

The sacroiliac joints (SI) connect the sacrum, the triangular shaped bone at the base of the lumbar spine to the left and right iliac bones, the large bones that form your pelvis. The SI joints have several functions They support the weight of your torso when you are upright They help maintain balance as you walk They act as shock absorbers for your spine They act as a hub for the transfer of force between your legs and your torso They are designed as a stable joint with limited mobility. Movement includes Nutation or anterior tilt (flexion) of the sacrum between the ilia Counter-nutation or posterior tilt (extension) of the sacrum between the ilia Small movements of the ilia themselves Stability of an SI joint depends primarily on the stout...

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Foot Anatomy, Problems and Top Tips for Functional Feet

As summer approaches I often teach a series of classes dedicated to “unloved body parts” as we prepare to peel off extra layers and get ready for the holiday season. For many, feet fall into this category, yet as the foundation of our bodies they are a really important part of our natural balance-keeping systems. Humans have a unique foot shape that allows us to walk, run, climb and do many other activities. Although hands have a similar structure, feet, because they bear more weight, are stronger and less mobile. The bones of the foot are organised in rows, named tarsal bones, metatarsal bones and phalanges. These make up the toes and blade of the foot. The largest bone of the foot is the heel (calcaneus), it...

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Big Toe Injury and Back pain

A year ago I partially severed and crushed the big toe of my left foot and had surgery to pin and stitch it. I was told full recovery would take a year and that my big toe would be stiff, but otherwise not to expect any long-term problems. Having done extensive bodywork, I felt my body was in a good place and wouldn’t be significantly affected by this injury – how wrong could I be? Following a successful surgical outcome and returning to work four weeks after the incident, it soon became apparent that all was not well. I was experiencing knee pain, my pelvis had become rotated and lower back pain followed. The road to full recovery has been long and slow but my salvation has...

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Free to Move – Fit to Shoot

Free to Move – Fit to Shoot ( A Unique Programme for Shooters) [embed]https://youtu.be/8qBAY9e07D4[/embed]   As a shooter I am very aware of the demands our sport places on the body. I have met shooters so afflicted with neck and shoulder damage that they require surgery or worse have to give up the sport they love. Although tales of being unable to put on shooting stockings without assistance due to lower back stiffness or struggling to remove a sweater because recoil has rendered the wearer unable to lift their arms are a humorous part of shoot day chatter, they are also indicative of the chronic effects of our one sided sport. Jokes aside, the effects of recoil are cumulative and cannot be underestimated. This video clip of John Heagren...

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Tuning in to the Magic within – Is your mind the most powerful tool when exercising?

“All that we are arises with our thoughts. With our thoughts, we make the world.” –Buddha One of the most frequent comments I receive from clients regarding why they enjoy Method Putkisto is that they cannot think about anything else whilst practising. Not only is it de-stressing, to be able to put those to-do lists, commuting annoyances and family worries to one side, but this enables them to get better results from their bodies. Focus It may sound obvious to say everybody’s body is different and therefore how each person experiences movement and exercise is different. You also arrive at each exercise session in a different emotional state, and this influences motivation. Consider the effect of exercising whilst in pain, agitated or depressed? However, by turning your attention inward, for...

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Wrist Flexibility and Mobility

A lot of people have been telling me about experiencing discomfort in their wrists when performing weight bearing exercises in class. Other stories about repetitive strain injuries, carpal tunnel and myriad wrist troubles, as well as Marja's recent workshop showcasing 'Wellbeing in the Office' have acted as inspiration to blog on another often overlooked joint. We tend to take the flexibility and mobility of our wrists for granted; whether it is tying shoelaces, throwing a frisbee, or cradling our newborn we expect our wrists to perform. However, long periods at a keyboard, playing certain sports or doing a job that involves repetitive tasks can take its toll. This diagram shows the movements your wrists and fingers should be able to do. The wrist joint is a complex joint...

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3 Reason to Stretch – Flexibility, Range of Movement & Strength

Many people struggle with inflexibility and diminished range of movement in their joints, especially as they age*. It is generally accepted that stretching is an important part of any fitness and exercise program, so why is it often the most overlooked or poorly executed part of such a program? Recent conflicting studies about the benefits of stretching have confused the 'to-stretch or not-to-stretch and when-to-stretch” debate, but as somebody who teaches Method Putkisto, an exercise method which incorporates several types of stretching and strengthening, I think it is important to highlight the positive results that I see in the large variety of bodies and their owners’ lifestyles until more research is done. Your focus may be on building strength, or you may prefer to regularly change your...

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Ankle Flexibility – Crucial to Body Positioning and Injury Prevention

Today we spent a whole class working on ankle flexibility; 75 minutes and nobody noticed the time passing. Why? As often happens the catalyst was somebody arriving fresh from a visit to the podiatrist, with a new pair of orthotics, and sharing the news of their diagnosis. Our ankles are often ignored or taken for granted, but their flexibility is key to body positioning, athletic performance and injury prevention. As stability joints, they must absorb force, transfer and stabilise weight as you walk, run, or simply get up out of a chair. This must happen quickly, and if you consider the average person takes 5,000 – 10,000 steps per day, you begin to realise the potential impact of learned movement patterns. The ankle is a hinge joint and on it’s...

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